Some Ghanaian Customs And Etiquette

By Friday, February 6, 2015 0 , , Permalink 0

Here are some interesting facts about Ghanaian customs are etiquette; 

Meeting Etiquette

Ghana_Kumasi_D4-0088

• Traditional or native greetings vary among the various ethnic groups.

• With foreigners the most common greeting is the handshake with a smile.

• When shaking hands between themselves Ghanaians will hold the right hand in the normal manner but will then twist and click each other’s middle finger.

• Unless you are experienced it is best to stick to a normal handshake!

• Christians will generally shake hands between the sexes; practising Muslims often will not shake hands with people of the opposite sex.

• Address Ghanaians by their academic, professional, or honorific title and their surname.

• As a sign of respect, males over the age of 30 may be addressed as “pah-pah” while women of the same age may be called mah-mee. People over the age of 50 may be referred to as nah-nah.

Gift Giving Etiquette

agahana gift shop/ digest.bellafricana

• Gifts need not be expensive; the thought is more important than the value.

• If invited to dinner at a Ghanaian’s home, you are not expected to bring a gift.

• However, a gift for the children is always a nice touch as it shows a concern for family.

• Gifts should be given using the right hand only or both hands. Never use the left hand.

• Gifts should be wrapped, although there are no cultural taboos concerning paper color.

• Gifts are not always opened when received.

Dining Etiquette

Ghana dining etiquette/ digest.bellafricana

• Ghanaians enjoy entertaining in their homes and you should accept any invitation as a sign of friendship.

• Dress well; Ghanaians place a lot of emphasis on how people dress. You may needto remove your shoes.

• Greet elders of heads of family first.

• Ghanaians table manners are relatively formal.

• Wait to be told where to sit.

• A washing basin will be brought out before the meal is served; use it to wash your hands.

• Food is generally served from a communal bowl.

• Do not begin eating until the eldest male does.

• Eat from the section of the bowl that is in front of you. Never reach across the bowl to get something from the other side.

• If you do not want to eat with your hands then ask for utensils.

• If you use your hands then scoop the food with the thumb and first two fingers of the right hand. Do not use your left hand.

Article by Anilyn Hepowit

Source : tours42plus.com